Homophily and Contagion Are Generically Confounded in Observational Social Network Studies

May 19, 2011

Shalizi, C., & Thomas, A. (2011). <a href=”Shalizi, C., & Thomas, A. (2011). Homophily and Contagion Are Generically Confounded in Observational Social Network Studies Sociological Methods & Research, 40 (2), 211-239 DOI: 10.1177/0049124111404820“>Homophily and Contagion Are Generically Confounded in Observational Social Network Studies Sociological Methods & Research, 40 (2), 211-239 DOI: 10.1177/0049124111404820 

Featured article: Available to download free of charge until November 15, 2011. 

Abstract & References

Cosma Rohilla Shalizi Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburgh, PA, USA, cshalizi@stat.cmu.edu 


Sensitivity Analysis for Contagion Effects in Social Networks

May 19, 2011

VanderWeele, T. (2011). Sensitivity Analysis for Contagion Effects in Social Networks Sociological Methods & Research, 40 (2), 240-255 DOI: 10.1177/0049124111404821 

Featured article: Available to download free of charge via Sage Publications until November 15, 2011.

Abstract & References

Tyler J. VanderWeele, Harvard University, Boston, MA, USA, tvanderw@hsph.harvard.edu


Direct and Indirect Effects for Neighborhood-Based Clustered and Longitudinal Data

June 17, 2010

ResearchBlogging.org

Tyler J. VanderWeele, Sociological Methods & Research 2010 38: 515-544.

 

Definitions of direct and indirect effects are given for settings in which individuals are clustered in groups or neighborhoods and in which treatments are administered at the group level. A particular intervention may Read the rest of this entry »


New Developments in Sequence Analysis

May 13, 2010

Christian Brzinsky-Fay and Ulrich Kohler: New Developments in Sequence Analysis, Sociological Methods Research 2010 38: 359-364.

Christian Brzinsky-Fay

Ulrich KohlerSequence analysis was originally invented by biologists with the aim of comparing DNA sequences in order to find out to what extent two DNA strands are homologous Read the rest of this entry »


Optimal Matching Analysis and Life-Course Data: The Importance of Duration

May 13, 2010

Brendan Halpin: Optimal Matching Analysis and Life-Course Data: The Importance of Duration, Sociological Methods Research 2010 38: 365-388.

Brendan HalpinThe optimal matching (OM) algorithm is widely used for sequence analysis insociology. It has a natural interpretation for discrete-time sequences but isalso widely used for life-history data, which are Read the rest of this entry »


Setting Cost in Optimal Matching to Uncover Contemporaneous Socio-Temporal Patterns

May 13, 2010

Laurent Lesnard: Setting Cost in Optimal Matching to Uncover Contemporaneous Socio-Temporal Patterns, Sociological Methods Research 2010 38: 389-419.

Laurent LesnardThis article addresses the question of the effects of cost setting on the kind of temporal patterns optimal matching (OM) can uncover when applied to social science data. Read the rest of this entry »


New Life for Old Ideas: The ‘‘Second Wave’’ of Sequence Analysis Bringing the ‘‘Course’’ Back Into the Life Course

May 13, 2010

Silke Aisenbrey and Anette E. Fasang: New Life for Old Ideas: The ‘‘Second Wave’’ of Sequence Analysis Bringing the ‘‘Course’’ Back Into the Life Course, Sociological Methods Research 2010 38: 420-462.

Silke AisenbreyAnette E. FasangIn this article the authors draw attention to the most recent and promising developments of sequence analysis. Read the rest of this entry »


Complexity of Categorical Time Series

May 13, 2010

Cees H. Elzinga: Complexity of Categorical Time Series, Sociological Methods Research 2010 38: 463-481.

Cees H. ElzingaCategorical time series, covering comparable time spans, are often quite different in a number of aspects: the number of distinct states, the number of transitions, and the distribution of durations Read the rest of this entry »


My Brilliant Career: Characterizing the Early Labor Market Trajectories of British Women From Generation X

May 13, 2010

Michael Anyadike-Danes and Duncan McVicar: My Brilliant Career: Characterizing the Early Labor Market Trajectories of British Women From Generation X Sociological Methods Research 2010 38: 482-512.

Michael Anyadike-DanesDuncan McvicarThis article uses longitudinal data from the British Cohort Study to examinethe early labor market trajectories Read the rest of this entry »


Comment on “EI extended model and the fear of ecological fallacy”, by Baodong Liu

April 21, 2010

The following comment refers to: Sociological Methods & Research, Vol. 36, No. 1, 3-25 (2007), EI Extended Model and the Fear of Ecological Fallacy, by Baodong Liu

Jeff ZaxLiu (2007) analyzes an interesting individual election contest in which the racial identities of voters and registrants are known. He uses this information to calculate true turnout rates by race Read the rest of this entry »


A Conceptual Framework for Ordered Logistic Regression Models

February 7, 2010

“Andrew S. Fullerton” : A Conceptual Framework for Ordered Logistic Regression Models, Sociological Methods & Research 2009 38: 306-347.

Ordinal-level measures are very common in social science research. Researchers often analyze ordinal dependent variables using the proportional odds logistic regression model. However, Read the rest of this entry »


Tracing the Effects of Hurricane Katrina on the Population of New Orleans: The Displaced New Orleans Residents Pilot Study

February 7, 2010

Narayan Sastry: Tracing the Effects of Hurricane Katrina on the Population of New Orleans: The Displaced New Orleans Residents Pilot Study, Sociological Methods & Research 2009 38: 171-196.

The Displaced New Orleans Residents Pilot Study is designed to examine the current location, well-being, and plans of people who lived in the city of New Orleans when Hurricane Katrina struck Read the rest of this entry »


Designing Scalar Questions for Web Surveys

February 7, 2010

Leah Melani Christian, Nicholas L. Parsons, and Don A. Dillman Designing Scalar Questions for Web Surveys Sociological Methods & Research 2009 37: 393-425. SMR 37:3 was a Special Issue on Web Surveys.

This paper explores how the visual design of scalar questions influences responses in web surveys. We present the results of five experiments Read the rest of this entry »


An Empirical Evaluation of the Use of Fixed Cutoff Points in RMSEA Test Statistic in Structural Equation Models

February 7, 2010

Feinian Chen, Patrick J. Curran, Kenneth A. Bollen, James Kirby, and Pamela Paxton An Empirical Evaluation of the Use of Fixed Cutoff Points in RMSEA Test Statistic in Structural Equation Models Sociological Methods & Research 2008 36: 462-494.

This article is an empirical evaluation of the choice of fixed cutoff points in assessing the root mean square error of approximation (RMSEA) test statistic as a measure of goodness-of-fit in StructuralEquation Models. Using simulation data, Read the rest of this entry »


A Mechanism-Based Approach to the Identification of Age–Period–Cohort Models

February 7, 2010

Christopher Winship and David J. Harding A Mechanism-Based Approach to the Identification of Age–Period–Cohort Models Sociological Methods & Research 2008 36: 362-401. SMR 36:3 was a Special Issue on Age-Period-Cohort Analysis.

Chris Winship, SMR EditorThis article offers a new approach to the identification of age–period–cohort (APC) models that builds on Pearl’s work on nonparametric causal models, in particular his front-door criterion for the identification of causal effects. Read the rest of this entry »


Replication Standards for Quantitative Social Science: Why Not Sociology?

February 7, 2010

Jeremy Freese Replication Standards for Quantitative Social Science: Why Not Sociology? Sociological Methods & Research 2007 36: 153-172. SMR 36:2 was a special issue on Replication and Data Analysis.

Jeremy FreeseThe credibility of quantitative social science benefits from policies that increase confidence that results reported by one researcher can be verified by others. Concerns about replicability have increased Read the rest of this entry »


Factorial Survey Methods for Studying Beliefs and Judgments

February 7, 2010

Guillermina Jasso, Factorial Survey Methods for Studying Beliefs and Judgments, Sociological Methods & Research 2006 34: 334-423.

This article develops a unified framework, based on Rossi’s factorial survey method, for studying positive beliefs and normative judgments. The framework enables estimation Read the rest of this entry »


Multimodel Inference: Understanding AIC and BIC in Model Selection

February 7, 2010

Kenneth P. Burnham and David R. Anderson, Multimodel Inference: Understanding AIC and BIC in Model Selection, Sociological Methods & Research 2004 33: 261-304.

The model selection literature has been generally poor at reflecting the deep foundations of the Akaike information criterion (AIC) and at making appropriate comparisons to the Bayesian information criterion (BIC). There is a clear philosophy Read the rest of this entry »


Multiple Imputation for Missing Data: A Cautionary Tale

February 7, 2010

Sociological Methods & Research 2000 28: 301-309.

Two algorithms for producing multiple imputations for missing data are evaluated with simulated data. Read the rest of this entry »